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Woman Financial Planner Phoenix Arizona 480-503-0050

Posted on Monday, August 31, 2015

PHOENIX ARIZONA WOMAN FINANCIAL PLANNER PHOENIX AZ FINANCIAL PLANNING PHOENIX CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNING HELP

PHOENIX ARIZONA FINANCIAL PLANNING HELP – Phoenix Certified Financial Planner Teresa Bear 480-503-0050 http://www.TeresaBear.com Blog Discusses Investor Differences Between Men and Women. 

Despite increased efforts to narrow the financial gap between men and women, there’s still no shortage of cultures that prioritize males when it comes to divvying up the monetary spoils. In China, when divorcing couples can’t agree on how to divide their assets, the family home typically goes to the men, even though Chinese women (and their parents) contribute to more than 70 percent of mortgages and 90 percent of cash purchases of homes. Because homes are often registered under the man’s name, the wife forfeits that investment by law. This is one of the common practices still in existence today that demonstrates the old Chinese saying: “Raising a daughter is like watering someone else’s garden.”

Project 50 #33 - Watering Can

[CLICK HERE to read the article, “Watering the gardens of others,” from The Economist, June 12, 2015.]

However, the financial world’s dated viewpoints on men and women aren’t just limited to foreign countries. In the U.S., males are often trusted to handle the family investments, something author Meredith Jones says should change in her new book, “Women of the Street: Why Female Money Managers Generate Higher Returns (And How You Can Too).” Jones writes that women’s specific characteristics can, in some situations, offer higher value. Women tend to be more conservative when it comes to money management, both personally and professionally, and a Vanguard study revealed that during the 2007-08 financial crisis, accounts led by women lost 13 percent, while accounts led by men lost 16 percent. Women were less likely to sell at or near market lows, and thus yield better returns, in part because of their conservative nature.

[CLICK HERE to read the article, “7 Reasons Women Make Better Money Managers than Men,” from ThinkAdvisor.com, June 10, 2015.]

[CLICK HERE to read the article, “Women Investors: Toss the Piggy Bank, Be Less Risk Averse,” from HeartsandWallets.com, Jan. 23, 2015.]

Although women, as a whole, currently make less than men, it’s possible that they could out earn their male counterparts over the course of their lifetimes. More women graduate from college than men, and they have longer lifespans. With people living and working longer than ever, it might not be long before women are retiring with more money despite a disadvantage in pay.

[CLICK HERE to read the article, “Women are dominating men at college. Blame sexism,” from The Washington Post, Dec. 11, 2014.]

[CLICK HERE to read the article, “Forget Retirement: Older Single Women Love Their Jobs,” from ThinkAdvisor.com, June 9, 2015.]

All of this brings to mind the story of the tortoise (women) and the hare (men). Perhaps with less flash and more plodding, conservative discipline wins the race. It did in the fable and may be the key to success in real life. Careful financial planning is no secret, and it’s a strategy men should practice as well. Whether you’re a tortoise or a hare, we’re here to help you determine strategies that can help you feel more confident in your financial future. Give us a call with any questions or concerns you may have.

We are an independent firm helping individuals create retirement strategies using a variety of insurance products to custom suit their needs and objectives. The information contained in this material is provided by third parties and has been obtained from sources believed to be reliable, but accuracy and completeness cannot be guaranteed; it is not intended to be used as the sole basis for financial decisions. If you are unable to access any of the news articles and sources through the links provided in this text, please contact us to request a copy of the desired reference. AE07155140

Greek Financial Drama Continues Abroad - While the US Debates Workplace Inequalities

Posted on Saturday, August 15, 2015

As we approach the dog days of summer, the world’s elected officials are pouring on the heat in political debates ranging from Euro debt to global trade agreements. Greece and its creditors have been arguing over how much debt Greece must repay each year. The discord has led others in the European Union — even Great Britain — to question if the single currency experiment is worth the time and effort. Years after the global recession, unemployment remains high, the population is aging fast and Eastern Europe has not recovered as quickly as expected.

WORKERS TAKE TO GREEK STREETS AGAINST CUTBACKS

Bear in mind that the EU is comprised of 28 separate countries operating as a single free enterprise market. Perhaps it’s understandable that 28 nations, combining different languages, cultures and history, can’t come together easily in agreement.

[CLICK HERE to read the article, “Greek Drama: Why the Negotiations Risk Europe’s Future,” from Knowledge@Wharton, June 10, 2015.]

[CLICK HERE to read the article, “Greece Gets Temporary Lifeline, Turns Hope to New Summit,” from The New York Times, June 19, 2015.]

But can you say the same about one country (the United States), composed of 50 states that all speak the same language and share basically the same history? The gulf in our nation’s capital continues to be as deep and divisive as the vast oceans that separate us from the world’s other developed countries. The most recent debate on tap has been the odd web of global trade negotiation legislation in the U.S., featuring the Republicans aligned with the Obama administration in a rare coalition. And yet, this force has been blocked by a strong minority of Democrats with just enough collective power to put a wrench in negotiations.

[CLICK HERE to read the article, “How Congress Voted on Trade,” from Govtrack, June 18, 2015.]

Then there is the ongoing campaign for fair wages, a forum currently being played out across multiple industries — both corporate and creative. The discrepancy between gender pay is certainly not a new debate, but has been thrust back into the spotlight in recent months by email hacks at Sony that revealed many blockbuster actresses are not compensated the same as their male counterparts. One study revealed that while in other industries women experience an average pay gap of 78 cents to a man’s dollar, in Hollywood the highest-paid actresses make just 40 cents for every dollar that the highest-paid actors make — a fact that gets lost amid multi-million dollar paychecks. These news headlines have occurred simultaneously as local, state and federal government bodies debate the merits of increasing the minimum wage. And where fair pay is concerned, recent newsworthy lawsuits and settlements in the music industry have highlighted discrepancies among artists and between artists and streaming music distributors.

[CLICK HERE to read the article, “The Gender Wage Gap Is Especially Terrible in Hollywood,” from Slate.com, Feb. 23, 2015.]

[CLICK HERE to read the article, “Navigating the Ripple Effects of a Higher Minimum Wage,” from Knowledge@Wharton, June 16, 2015.]

[CLICK HERE to read the article, “James Taylor: Streaming Businesses Should Pay Artists Half,” from Times Daily, June 19, 2015.]

While the world debates bigger issues, we’re help to help you navigate the different ways to potentially optimize your own assets, liabilities and retirement income. If we can help you sweat out the details of a retirement income plan for your unique situation, please give us a call.

We are an independent firm helping individuals create retirement strategies using a variety of insurance products to custom suit their needs and objectives. The information contained in this material is provided by third parties and has been obtained from sources believed to be reliable, but accuracy and completeness cannot be guaranteed; it is not intended to be used as the sole basis for financial decisions. If you are unable to access any of the news articles and sources through the links provided in this text, please contact us to request a copy of the desired reference. AE07155124

ARIZONA RETIREMENT PLANNING - Is Your Retirement Just a Number?

Posted on Friday, February 20, 2015

Throughout our lives, we are identified by numbers. Social Security number. Employee ID number. Driver's license number. The amount of money that you make. The number of children and grandchildren that you have. The value of your home.

Fortunately, those numbers are simply points of reference; they don't truly define who we are. Our personal accomplishments do this. Our career. Our family. The way we respond in stressful situations. The way we treat people on a daily basis.

But as we near and enter retirement, we are once again focused on a number: How much money might each of us need saved to live the retirement lifestyle we desire? If you watch the ads on television, you may get the impression that there's one magical number out there for all of us that can make all of our retirement dreams come true, but that is not the case.

[CLICK HERE to read the article, "Finding Your 'Magic Number' for Retirement Savings," from CNBC, Aug. 27, 2014.]


One of the nice things about getting older is the wisdom that accompanies age. If you are in or approaching retirement, you've most likely learned by now that there's no one thing that defines you and your happiness. Our lives, our challenges and our accomplishments are complex.


So is our income. Throughout a professional career, income levels vary. For some, there's an upward slope. For others, there are peaks and valleys. It's good to consider your retirement income in much the same manner. That's because your expenses can fluctuate from year-to-year, despite your best attempts at planning and budgeting for both expected and unexpected costs during retirement. Early in retirement, you may spend more money traveling; later on, you may spend more on medical bills and long-term care. You may pay for a wedding one year, and then help a grandchild with college tuition somewhere down the road. If you live a long time in retirement, inflation may affect your expenses.

[CLICK HERE to read the article, "The New Retirement Income Benchmark," from BlackRock, Oct. 22, 2014.]

[CLICK HERE to read the article, "Primer: Home Equity → Retiree Income," from Squared Away Blog, Oct. 2, 2014.]

That's why it's good to have steady income sources, to help ensure you always have money to pay the bills. It's also beneficial to have a variety of income sources, so you have extra money now and then to splurge on things that make you happy, like weekly golf outings and taking a vacation with the grandkids. Finally, it's good to have money set aside that can accumulate during your retirement years, to be there when you need it for an emergency and to help ensure that you never run out.


[CLICK HERE to read the article, "Finke: What Makes a Successful Retirement?" from ThinkAdvisor, Jan. 27, 2014.]

[CLICK HERE to read the article, "Retirement: A Good State of Mind," from Center for Retirement Research at Boston College's Squared Away Blog, Sept. 23, 2014.]

As you create a strategy for your financial future, consider those all-important numbers when planning for retirement income. Still, it's not how much we have that defines us. It's how we spend our money that embodies and reflects our priorities and values. As we get older, those are the things that help define who we are.


If we can help you establish a retirement income plan with checks and balances and factors that can allow for fluctuating needs throughout your retirement, please give us a call.

Our firm assists retirees and pre-retirees in the creation of retirement strategies utilizing insurance products. Our firm is not affiliated with the U.S. government or any governmental agency.

This content is provided for informational purposes only. It is provided by third parties and has been obtained from sources believed to be reliable, but accuracy and completeness cannot be guaranteed. The information is not intended to be used as the sole basis for financial decisions, nor should it be construed as advice designed to meet the particular needs of an individual's situation.

If you are unable to access any of the news articles and sources through the links provided in this text, please contact us to request a copy of the desired reference.

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